I had the opportunity to attend the Environmental Health Symposium 2020 annual event "Immunotoxicity: The Intersection between Toxic Exposure, Infectious Disease and Autoimmunity" held online on April 4 - April 5, 2020. This was my first EHS event, and I hope it won't be my last.  In two days, 18 lectures were presented; it was like drinking from a firehose (I love firehoses!).

For practitioners, I highly urge you to check out EHS and get the recordings of the event.  My notes below are a small subset of the information covered at the event.

Disclaimer: Nothing in this text is intended to serve as medical advice. All medical decisions should be made only with the guidance of your own personal licensed medical authority.

Disclaimer: This information was taken as notes during the training course and may not represent the exact statements of the speakers. Errors and/or omissions may be present.

Note: As this information may be updated as any errors are found, I kindly request that you link to this single source of information rather than copying the content below. If any updates or corrections are made, this will help to ensure that anyone reading this is getting the most current and accurate information available.  

Jill Carnahan, MD spoke on "The Big Picture: The Intersection of Chronic Infection and Toxicant Exposure" and shared:

  • Toxic load is about resilience and our ability to overcome the onslaught of what we encounter in our environment.
  • Toxic load is what causes pandemics like we see today, autoimmunity, degeneration; toxins overwhelm our ability to detoxify and heal.
  • We were born to be resilient, but chemicals in our environment overload our capacity.
  • Dose is not always the poison; small amounts of a toxin can have very significant effects.
  • Can be external exposures but also internal exposures from our metabolism; or even stress or fear.
  • Exotoxins are metals, solvents, pesticides, EMFs, molds, plastics, etc.; endotoxins are LPS, acetaldehyde, infections, food chemicals and additives, stress, emotions.
  • Total toxic burden is a bucket overflowing; goal is to lower total toxic burden to detoxify and heal. Once the patient has margin, resilience to overcome is returned; we do not need to identify every last issue.
  • Environmental toxins increase every year.
  • In genetically-susceptible individuals, dysfunction leads to chronic illness.
  • Susceptibility is defined by the individual's ability to biotransform, detoxify, and eliminate toxins.
  • Lifestyle, diet, and nutritional supplements can enhance detox, prevent disease, and restore health.
  • If treatments mobilize but the patient cannot excrete, patients get worse.
  • Skin issues are common with toxicity: rashes, eczema, psoriasis.
  • Cancer, autoimmunity, and degenerative disease (Parkinson's, Alzheimer's) are often related to toxic exposures.
  • Infertility is a sign that the body is not in a healthy state to have a baby.
  • Individuals harmed by "permitted exposures" are often the ones that come to her for support. 10-20% of the population are sensitive.
  • Avoidance is a key to recovery.
  • Genetics point the gun; the environment pulls the trigger.
  • 85% of chronic illness is lifestyle; 15% is genetic.
  • Assume everyone coming to see you has some degree of toxicity.
  • Looks at: liver, kidney, blood counts, thyroid, hormones, adrenals, homocysteine, iron/ferritin, MTHFR, HLA DQB1, HLA-DR (less now than previously), D, lipids, B12/folate/zinc/magnesium/selenium/copper, toxicants, fatty acids, ANA, metals, stool, organic acids, amino acids, glucose/insulin, gliadin, immunoglobulins, CIRS labs.
  • Looks for numerous infections: viruses, strep, Lyme and coinfections, Candida, Clostrida, parasites, H. Pylori, Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, nasal swab.
  • Viral IgG titers 4 times the normal limit can be reactivation.
  • Often, people are going along just fine even with Lyme until they get a mold exposure.
  • Many positive for Lyme are asymptomatic.
  • Environmental toxin exposure and depleted immune systems make a big difference.
  • TBRF (relapsing fever) are a much larger issue now that testing is available.
  • Mycotoxins are small and can move in an out of cells; hard to detect in the blood. Secreted by liver into bile and reabsorbed if not tagged by an antibody; enterohepatic recirculation.
  • Mold impacts the endocrine system; leads to metabolic syndrome; can cause weight gain as a result of leptin.
  • Chemical exposure explodes into autoimmunity and inflammation.
  • Mold illness is related to the innate immune response (cannot clear toxins); allergy to mold is related to the acquired immune response (IgE, MCAS).
  • There is a toxic soup in water-damaged buildings; not just mold.
  • Beta glucans which are often taken for immune support are often found in water-damaged buildings; some may not tolerate them.
  • Methanobrevibacter can be found in WDBs.
  • Uses symptom cluster evaluation to explore possible CIRS.
  • Visual contrast testing can provide additional insight.
  • In testing the environment, a good IEP is critical.
  • ERMI and HERTSMI-2: best to have an IEP, but these tools can be very helpful as an additional screening.
  • In cases where she suspected mold, it has been found in 100% of cases.
  • ERMI score at the end is not useful but looking at the mold species is helpful; HERTSMI-2 is helpful.
  • EMMA is a new test looking for mycotoxins.
  • Urinary mycotoxin testing is controversial; it is an excretion of toxins. Any positive test may be significant. Finds incredibly helpful.
  • Provokes with glutathione or sauna before the urine collection. Also need to avoid binders before collection.
  • Mycotoxins profoundly damage the intestinal lining and lead to leaky gut; can trigger Crohn's and colitis.
  • Urinary mycotoxins are available through RealTime, Great Plans, and Vibrant. Uses all three; are different technologies.
  • Mycotoxin antibody testing is available as well. Has not used much but starting to.
  • Mycotoxins cause powerful and diverse toxic effects, weaken the immune system, and make everything else worse.
  • Zinc, D, A, probiotics, Glutamine, and Bovine Immunoglobulins may be helpful with mold exposure.
  • NADPH is used to recycle glutathione; with mold exposure, NAD is depleted. NAD is key for detox and energy production.
  • Healing from mold exposure needs NAD and methylated B vitamins.
  • Clean air, clean water, clean food are foundations. Consider off-gassing.
  • Optimize elimination and excretion, improve gut microbiome, support mitochondria, optimize biotransformation (phase 1, phase 2, phase 3)
  • Glycine is a rate limiting factor for production of glutathione.
  • Constipation must be addressed first.
  • Coffee enemas and colon hydrotherapy can be very helpful.
  • Highly sensitive people perceive details that others do not; a good and bad side to being an HSP; https://hsperson.com
  • Limbic retraining like DNRS can mitigate amygdala activation; 100% of patients with mold exposure have a trauma response. Every time they are exposed to mold, the fear response (feeling unsafe) is triggered. These tools are critical to healing from mold.
  • Childhood trauma (ACEs) have a larger effect on health than anything else.
  • For NAD support, Tru Niagen Pro or QuickSilver NAD Gold Plus are her favorites; IV NAD is not a favorite.
  • Need methylated B vitamins when using NAD or you can deplete them.

Cindy Russell, MD spoke on "Immunotoxic Effects of EMF/EMR: Wifi and Devices" and shared:

  • EMRs are immunotoxic.
  • Neurologic, reproductive, hematologic, cancer, eye effects, sleep, addiction, distraction effects.
  • Smart Phones have 4 antennae: Bluetooth, cellular, GPS, WiFi
  • Types of electromagnetic energy: wireless radiation, electrical fields, magnetic fields, dirty electricity
  • Humans are electrical beings; wireless radiation passes through our bodies. Water in our body absorbs wireless radiation.
  • FCC standards are decades old and based on heat only; not biological harm.
  • About 18% of people are electrosensitive; similar to MCS but reacting to EMFs.
  • Reactive Oxygen Species - important in killing microbes, but detoxification of ROS is key; imbalance leads to oxidative stress and inflammation.
  • Children are more vulnerable to toxic exposures including EMF.
  • Wireless impacts brain, liver, kidneys, sperm, ovaries, embryonal cells.
  • Voltage gated calcium channels diffuse calcium in and out of cells. Disruption connected to bipolar, schizophrenia, and autism.
  • Radiation exposure decreases antibody response; may create autoantibodies that react with brain tissue and create auto-allergy.
  • US exposure standards allow far more than many other countries such as Russia.
  • Some people have an allergic reaction to WiFi; hypersensitivity reactions. Mast cells can play a role.
  • Electrohypersensitivity is a reaction to radiation damage similar to UV light or ionizing radiation. Increase in mast cells and degranulation may occur.
  • Skin symptoms, neurologic, cardiovascular symptoms.
  • Headaches, dizziness, insomnia, memory changes, irritability, and depression.
  • 2 million people in the US may have EHS.
  • One study found increase in histamine, myelin antibodies, decreased melatonin, and opening of the blood-brain barrier.
  • Memory deficits may occur with mobile phone use.
  • Strong association between cell phone use and brain tumors.
  • 5G promises revolutionary technology as a necessity for Internet of Things (IoT) and self-driving cars.
  • Antennae every 200 feet or less; combines other toxic frequencies as well. No safety studies.
  • Questions around impact of 5G rollout on COVID-19 epidemic; does the immune suppression of 5G make us more vulnerable?
  • Turn off WiFi, hardwire computers, remove cordless phones, use airplane mode, turn off Bluetooth in the car, use a landline, remove smart meters.
  • Supplements for supporting the body: D, C, E, zinc, melatonin, sleep, eating organic
  • Physicians for Safe Technology; mdsafetech.org

Tom Levy MD spoke on "Optimizing the Treatment of Infections and Toxins" and shared:

  • Cause of all disease is increased intracellular oxidative stress.
  • Pro-oxidants steal electrons (oxidation); antioxidants give an electron (reduction).
  • Vitamin C is the prototype antioxidant; gets everywhere in the body. Some antioxidants are more powerful but don't access the entire body.
  • Pro-oxidants are toxins; pathogens are toxin providers, antioxidants are toxin neutralizers.
  • Focal infections generate oxidative stress.
  • Vitamin C is an absolute antitoxin.
  • Pathogens increase oxidative stress; produce endotoxins, exotoxins, oxidized metabolic byproducts, and the release of free iron as they die or lyse infected host cells. More iron -> more pathogen proliferation.
  • Characteristics of toxins: solubility (fat, water, combo), size, ionic charge, molecular structure, how readily it oxidizes biomolecules, tendency to produce oxidative chain reactions vs. oxidizing single biomolecules.
  • Promoters of chronic disease: infections and their toxins (including oral cavity and dental issues), pathogen colonization (sinus, respiratory), exogenous toxin exposures (metals, pesticides, etc.).
  • Prevent toxins, neutralize toxins, excrete toxins (sauna), resolve infections, supplement, address hormone imbalance.
  • Detoxification causes some retoxification.
  • Primary pathology of all disease is increased intracellular oxidative stress. Determinants: Calcium, Magnesium, C, Glutathione
  • Calcium is behind 100% of increased oxidative stress leading to disease; higher calcium -> higher disease.
  • Supplemental calcium increases risk of heart attack and increases all-cause mortality. Calcium is not good; a primary cancer-causing agent.
  • Magnesium and calcium oppose each other; magnesium is a natural calcium channel blocker; enormous positive health impact.
  • When intracellular calcium is high and magnesium low, vitamin C is always low as well.
  • Glutathione is a secondary player; will not be normal until calcium, magnesium, and C normalize.
  • Insulin, hydrocortisone, thyroid, and sex hormones are the most critical in the body.
  • Critical factors to optimize vitamin C levels inside cells: levels of hormones, eliminate focal infections and chronic pathogen colonization, optimize body-wide magnesium, optimize digestion, and supplement.
  • Estrogen is a calcium channel blocker, raises intracellular magnesium, reduces elimination of magnesium, anti-inflammatory. Testosterone is very similar.
  • Calcium channel blockers block the ability of calcium to get inside the cells.
  • Insulin promotes magnesium and vitamin C uptake.
  • Hydrocortisone is a calcium channel blocker, anti-inflammatory, greatly enhances uptake of vitamin C.
  • Primary role of the immune system is to deliver vitamin C to tissues where it is needed.
  • Thyroid hormone modulates oxidative stress, normalizes intracellular magnesium, prevents calcium in the cells.
  • 100% of root canals are infected and serves as a focal infection.
  • Thyroid tests cannot diagnose more mild hypothyroidism.
  • 15-20% of T3 is produced in the thyroid gland; the rest produced in the cells.
  • Best to test temperature and look for ideal of 97.8-98.2 on waking.
  • Want normalization of free T3/reverse T3; aim for 18:1 to 20:1 ratio. When the ratio is low, it is important to find and address sources of oxidative stress.
  • Focal infections don't disseminate and cancers don't metastasize when thyroid status is optimized.
  • Best magnesium are liposomal magnesium threonate, transdermal magnesium or nebulization of magnesium chloride (with DMSO, sodium ascorbate, insulin, and hydrocortisone).
  • 99% of magnesium is intracellular; 95% of that is inside the mitochondria.
  • Exatest.com is a way to measure magnesium to look at intracellular levels.
  • Difficult to find anyone without magnesium deficiency.
  • The older the person, the more toxin debt, the more oxidation, the lower the magnesium.
  • Magnesium deficiency involved in high blood pressure, coronary artery spasm, almost all migraines, eclampsia, cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, epilepsy, seizures, Alzheimer's, Metabolic Syndrome, cardiac arrhythmias, congestive heart failure.
  • Nebulize (with a doctor's guidance): needs to be water soluble; DMSO/Magnesium/sodium ascorbate normalizes nasopharyngeal flora and improves gut function.
  • No prescription antibiotic can destroy a biofilm; natural agents can.
  • Tongue scraping can reduce elevated CRP.
  • Nebulizing hydrogen peroxide can help with chronic pathogen colonization.
  • Nebulizing options: hydrogen peroxide, DMSO, C, magnesium chloride, zinc, colloidal silver, iodine, glutathione, NAC; no oils or fat-soluble agents.
  • For cold or flu, nebulizing 3% hydrogen peroxide (or less). No need to suffer from a lasting cold or flu.
  • Tongue hygiene is critical to overall health.
  • Most potent antiviral on the planet is ozone; followed by vitamin C.
  • Even with COVID-19, it cannot stand in the face of ozone, C, and hydrogen peroxide.
  • Coronavirus prevention: C (2-3 grams 2-3 times a day), magnesium (hundreds of mgs per day), D (15-25,000 IU day), zinc
  • Horribly contagious; can go from minimal symptoms to death in 24 hours.
  • For COVID-19, nebulized hydrogen peroxide several times per day for 15-30 minutes. DMSO/C/Magnesium is another option.
  • Liposomal vitamin C is a good option when IV C is not available.
  • China is using vitamin C for COVID-19 with good results.
  • Best to give vitamin C in divided doses than larger dose given at once.
  • Chloroquine (and hydroxychloroquine) is the death nail for COVID-19; zinc is what kills the virus. Chloroquine provides a conduit for getting zinc inside the cells. It could end this epidemic.
  • Used to say the most important with vitamin C was "dose, dose, dose", but now says "frequency, frequency, frequency...and dose".
  • Big guns for COVID-19 are nebulization, chorloquine, and zinc.

Lawrence Afrin, MD spoke on "Mast Cell Activation Disease: Current Concepts" and shared:

  • MCAS first recognized about a decade ago.
  • Patient with Burning Mouth Syndrome had 100-fold elevation in Chromogranin A. Assumed to be a malignancy; all negative. Later found significantly increased mast cells. Antihistamines and NSAIDs led to immediate improvement. MCAS has been found in every BMS patient he has evaluated since.
  • Many divergent presentations can have the same root cause (MCAS).
  • 10-20% of world's population have various allergic diseases.
  • Mastocytosis is a rare condition; MCAS is not.
  • KIT D816V mutation found in majority of Mastocytosis cases.
  • Mastocytosis is increased proliferation; MCAS is increased activation but not proliferation.
  • Mast cells are predominant at environmental interfaces (skin, GI, genitourinary tract, vessels).
  • Many triggers including Corticotropin-releasing factor (associated with stress).
  • Many toll-like receptors for microorganisms can trigger mast cells.
  • Mast cells produce an extraordinary array of mediators (cytokines, chemokines, proteases, growth factors, histamine, heparin, chondroitin, serotonin, antimicrobial agents such as LL37, and many others).
  • Mast cells involved in IBS, CFS, Fibro, diabetes, asthma, obesity, depression, atherosclerosis, and more.
  • Inflammation is the universal constant.
  • Tryptase is almost always normal in MCAS.
  • Can see an increased baseline in the behavior of the mast cells after a triggering event.
  • Teeth and gums deteriorate or crumble for no apparent reason in some with MCAS.
  • MCAS can impact every system in the body including the CNS leading to neurological and psychiatric issues.
  • Many mast cell mediators have very short half-lives at room temperature or higher; continuous chilling of biological samples is essentials when testing for MCAS.
  • Most MCAS patients eventually identify a significantly helpful regimen; have a normal lifespan.
  • Identify triggers, inhibit mediator production, inhibit mediator release, block the released mediators, treat the secondary issues and comorbidities.
  • Allogeneic stem cell transplantation may be able to resolve MCAS in the future; challenging and not done yet in MCAS.
  • Vitamin C, D, ALA, NAC, PEA, CBD may be helpful.
  • Mast cells are programmed to recognize mold antigens (and other pathogens).
  • Flavonoids (quercetin, luteolin, C) can be helpful for MCAS.
  • Malabsorption and micronutrient deficiencies are seen in MCAS due to impact to the GI tract.
  • MCAS patients are not likely more susceptible to acquiring COVID-19, but once infected, they may have a more significant presentation.

Dan Kinderlehrer, MD spoke on "PANS (Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome): Microbes and Autoimmune Encephalopathy" and shared:

  • Constipation in childhood is often food sensitivities with dairy at the top of the list.
  • Cunningham Panel often used to explore potential for PANDAS/PANS.
  • In some cases of MTHFR, homocysteine may be low due to upregulation of CBS.
  • Susan Swedo first reported on children having neuropsych symptoms after exposure to Strep.
  • PANDAS kids may have elevated ANA to dopamine receptors, lysoganglioside, and tubulin.
  • Antibodies to the Strep attack the host.
  • PANS is a similar condition but not associated with Strep.
  • Abrupt onset of OCD or eating disorder and 2 of: anxiety, emotional lability or depression, irritability/depression/oppositional behavior, behavioral regression, sudden deterioration in school performance, motor or sensory abnormalities, somatic signs and symptoms (sleep disturbance, enuresis, urinary frequency).
  • Microbes that trigger PANS: Herpes simplex, Varicella, HIV, common cold, Mycoplasma, Influenza A, EBV, sinusitis, mold, Bartonella.
  • Might we see PANS related to COVID-19?
  • Positive correlation between neuropsych symptoms and CamKII activation.
  • Cunningham Panel is 88% sensitive and 83% specific.
  • Tick-borne disease can overlap with PANS. ANA are present in "PTLDS" patients.
  • OSpA (Band 31) has a protein sequence similar to Group A Strep; can trigger autoimmune activity.
  • Lyme disease is a probably trigger of PANS; not yet documented without evidence of co-infections.
  • Co-infections such as Bartonella and Mycoplasma trigger autoimmunity and can trigger PANS.
  • Bartonella triggers more inflammation and more autoimmunity than any other microbe encountered in his practice.
  • Most common manifestations in PANS-like syndromes in his practice (don't meet strict criteria): anxiety, OCD, irritability, anger, depression, tics; without abrupt onset and eating disorder.
  • Tested 10 kids in an adolescent treatment center with depression, anxiety, cutting; probable (including indeterminants which are almost always real) Borrelia burgdorferi in 8/10; Bartonella in 4/10; TBRF in 6/10; Borrelia burgdorferi and Bartonella in 3/10; Borrelia burgdorferi and TBRF in 5/10; Borrelia burgdorferi and TBRF and Bartonella in 1/10. Had only 1 negative Cunningham Panel out of the 10 adolescents.
  • Treatment includes: antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, IVIG, psychotropic medication, psychotherapy.
  • Antibiotics were most effective treatment in one online survey; beta-lactams and azithromycin. Ibuprofen, steroid tapers (he does not recommended due to immune suppression), antihistamines. IVIG most effective with low IgG; improvement not always sustained. SSRIs more effective than other options but often ineffective. Cognitive behavioral therapy somewhat effective. Plasmapheresis - most had initial improvement but 60% did not sustain the response.
  • Katz study followed 112 patients with Lyme and PANS symptoms; most effective antibiotic was LA Bicillin; more effective than IV antibiotics or steroids.
  • Growing evidence that mast cells play a role in many autoimmune diseases including PANS.
  • Treatment of MCAS: H1/H2 blockers, DAO, leukotriene inhibitors, low histamine diet, quercetin, Ketotifen, Cromolyn (very effective in PANS).
  • Treatment for autoimmune encephalopathy includes antibiotics (Bicillin, azithromycin (liposomal may help), Disulfiram(?)), Anti-inflammatories (NSAIDS, CBDs, EFA, boswellia, curcumin), IVIG, treating MCAS.
  • Disulfiram has great potential but can have significant side effects when used incorrectly or at too high a dose.
  • CBD can help to decrease MCAS and neuroinflammation.
  • Consider treating: food sensitivity, mold, LDI, LDN, MCS(?), EMFs(?).
  • Stress interventions may be helpful.
  • Biofeedback may be helpful.
  • Multiple microbes can lead to PANS and autoimmunity.
  • Acute onset and eating disorder (criteria for PANS) are often absent but autoimmune encephalitis may still present.
  • PANS is likely not an issue in children only; may see this in adults.
  • Many health epidemics in modern times; environmental factors, genetics, epigenetic, nutrition, toxins, stress/trauma, EMFs, breakdown of social support structures, lacking of feeling of "safety".
  • Epigentic changes are passed down; babies are not born with a clean slate.
  • Patients need to know that their doctor won't give up.
  • Bicillin likely does not work for Mycoplasma as it does not have a cell wall.

Tyrone Hayes, PhD spoke on "Atrazine: Lessons About Human Toxicity" and shared:

  • Discovered a frog in Africa where they look completely different on their surface based on their sex.
  • Dipped frogs into testosterone and nothing happened.
  • Dipped frogs into estradiol and and observed a change.
  • Synthetic and RX estrogens induced the same change.
  • DDT mimics estrogen and causes a similar change in color.
  • Could test the frogs with compounds for potential of breast cancer.
  • Estrogen antagonist Tamoxifen blocked the estrogen-induced color change.
  • Were asked to screen Atrazine; number one selling herbicide at the time (now #2).
  • Atrazine inhibited the growth of the voicebox in male frogs.
  • Atrazine may be reducing testosterone.
  • Frogs had both testes and ovaries.
  • Atrazine may induce aromatase to convert testosterone into estrogen leading to feminization including growth of ovaries.
  • They are males that develop ovaries in addition to testes.
  • Some of the males that grew ovaries functioned as females as adults and mated with males.
  • Atrazine treated males were unable to obtain copulation with females when in presence of control males.
  • Atrazine treated males had lower testosterone levels than control males.
  • Frog fertility is 15% if exposed to atrazine. Don't attempt to copulate with females.
  • Controls have testicular tubules; atrazine have empty testicular tubules.
  • Atrazine levels in drinking water, temporary pools, permanent water, and precipitation higher than in their studies; same phenomenon occurs in the wild.
  • Atrazine can travel 1000km in rain water.
  • 80% of the world's amphibians are in decline; pesticides are playing a big role.
  • If atrazine works this way in frogs, we would expect it to work the same in humans and other animals.
  • Has been replicated in fish, amphibians, reptiles, rats, birds - exposure to atrazine leads to no sperm.
  • A colleague showed that in human males, men with low sperm count and infertility have higher levels of urinary atrazine.
  • Farm workers have 24,000 times the atrazine in their urine.
  • 8.4 fold increase in prostate cancer in men that bag atrazine.
  • Atrazine may also be a promoter of breast cancer.
  • Same company that produced the chemical that may lead to breast cancer made the compound to treat the resulting cancer.
  • In rats, atrazine causes prostate and mammary cancer, leads to immune failure, leads to neural damage, and increased abortion, prostate disease, and impaired mammary development. Impaired mammary development led to the offspring having impaired growth and development even though not having direct atrazine exposure.
  • Atrazine may lead to higher rates of birth defects.
  • EPA acknowledges the problem, but someone has to pay the price for the use of the chemical.
  • 50% of the food in the US comes from California; uses more pesticides than any other state.
  • Unproportionally impacts LatinX community as many work in agriculture.
  • Terbuthylazine is one methyl group different from atrazine and may have the same problems as it is more potent.
  • Those who have the privilege to know have the duty to act.
  • Atrazine used in corn, on golf courses, sugar cane, forestry.
  • Number one contaminant of drinking water and rain water.
  • Can filter atrazine out of water; carbon filters.
  • Inhalation and dermal exposure are primary occupational risks.
  • Atrazine testing is done in research.
  • Is water soluble and can be flushed out if the repeated exposure is removed.

Stephen Fry, PhD spoke on "Neurologic Disorders - Multiple Sclerosis and ALS. The Potential Roles of Fungi and Mercury" and shared:

  • He started with CFS patients which were similar to MS patients.
  • Criteria for MS: McDonald criteria; MRI diagnosis with lesions. ALS: electrophysiologic changes
  • Evidence: Histology/Stains, Immunology/Serology, Mass Spec, Proteomics, Molecular Microbiology (FISH, PCR, NGS). Physical observation, dynamic studies (MRI, nerve conduction), statistics, clinical response.
  • Next Generation DNA Sequencing is like a "tricorder" of infectious diseases.
  • Fungi: 300 clinically relevant; 2017 estimate suggests 2.2 to 3.8 million species of fungi.
  • Enormous increase in opportunistic fungal infections due to AIDS and immunocompromising medications.
  • Infections happen because the immune system is weak.
  • Initial hit to the immune system could be viral.
  • Numerous viruses with very few tests for them.
  • Can have a viremia that settles down into the tissue and leads to autoimmune disease.
  • An increase in Funneliformis mosseae is seen in MS patients.
  • Fungal toxins may be the underlying cause of MS.
  • HLA DRB1 15 a genetic risk for MS and associated with fungal infections.
  • Many biomarkers of MS are consistent with fungal infections.
  • In 2008 study, serum Candida antibodies were found in 7 of 8 with MS.
  • In ALS, fungi have been detected with several detection methods.
  • Innate immune system recognizes mannoproteins in cell walls of fungi.
  • CFS/ME has many similarities with MS; lesions as a prelude to MS; evidence of fungi, positive urinary mycotoxins.
  • Fungal antigens and DNA from several fungi seen in ALS.
  • Clusters of ALS seen in grass-associated fungi and their neurotoxins.
  • Normal control blood shows some fungi but in unhealthy people, the fungi get a foothold after some kind of damage.
  • Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were found in all regions in one study in ALS.
  • In his study for ALS, 15 ALS and 47 normal controls; all patients with ALS had the algae Hydrurus.
  • Most antifungals have liver toxicity or kidney toxicity; need to be used for a long period of time.
  • In MS, Dimethyl furamate (DMF) or Tecfidera has been explored. Some say it modulates the immune system; he feels its benefits are due to antifungal properties.
  • ALS is a terrible disease; a drug that runs $4K per month extends life a few months.
  • Rapamycin or Sirolimus has antifungal properties. Toxic medication.
  • In vascular obstructive disease, plaques are full of fungi, protozoans, and algae.
  • CCSVI has lost favor, but vegetations are observed by ultrasound. Mostly eukaryotes.
  • Environmental fungi are tough fungi; not easy to address with antifungals.
  • Mercury leads to immunosuppression.
  • MS patients with amalgams were more symptomatic.
  • Metal chelation led to improvement suggestive of MS remission.
  • Seafood and fish eaters have double the risk of ALS.
  • Whole food, plant based diet often helpful for MS.
  • Fungi hold on to toxic heavy metals.
  • Chitin absorbs metals; fungi have chitin.
  • Neurodegenerative disease may have a first hit being viral and then fungi may then start to colonize and lead to disease. Metals may exacerbate the condition.
  • Treatment: diet, exercise, chelating agents, herbals, ozone, C, HBOT, exosomes, angioplasty, biofilm busters, RX antifungals; new drugs are needed.
  • MS and ALS could have fungal origin with mercury as a co-factor.
  • Antifungals have shown efficacy in MS.
  • Immunosenescence may be related to viruses. RNA viruses like Chikungunya and alphaviruses lead to a viremia; disappear from the bloodstream in a month or two but moves into the tissue. Many more viruses than bacteria.
  • Over time, the viruses wear down the immune system. It is not age, but viral load.
  • No good way to measure mercury body burden.
  • Patients likely have a fungal issue and a viral issue.
  • It may be that the fungi serve a role in nature creating mycotoxins that may be suppressing the viral issue which is the core issue.
  • Barley is high in chitinase.

Richard Horowitz, MD spoke on "Chronic Lyme Disease" and shared:

  • Infection, Inflammation, and Immune Dysfunction
  • Seeing more TBRF; relapsing fever
  • Recent publication on healthy fetal outcomes
  • 70-80 ALS patients in his practice have all tested positive for Borrelia burgdorferi.
  • Borrelia found in Alzheimer's brains.
  • Persisters with multiple intracellular bacteria; Babesia persisters and Bartonella, Mycoplasma, Tularemia, Brucella
  • Infections and environmental toxins drive inflammation and increase autoimmune reactions.
  • ARDS with COVID-19 is associated with NFKb.
  • Infections create free radicals and mitochondrial damage.
  • It is not just about infections themselves; some infections produce toxins such as quinolinic acid.
  • High dose glutathione clears that brain in 70% of people.
  • Lyme, CPn, EBV all seen in autoimmune reactions. Environmental toxins are major triggers of autoimmunity.
  • Infections and toxins drive inflammation and lead to chronic disease.
  • Every few years, we find new tick-borne infections; there are hundreds of viruses in ticks alone.
  • 84.5% of his patients had one or more heavy metals such as lead, mercury, cadmium, aluminum, and arsenic.
  • Over 70% of patients that had mold history, were positive on urinary mycotoxin testing including aflatoxin, ochratoxin, trichothecenes; 100% with gliotoxins.
  • Common denominator for all chronic illnesses is inflammation.
  • 16 point MSIDS: Infections, GI dysbiosis, Leaky gut/food sensitivity, sleep, environmental toxins, nutritional deficiency (zinc, copper, mag), endocrine disorders (low T, adrenals), neurological/psychological dysfunction, POTS/dysautonomia (40%), mitochondrial dysfunction (1/3 of patients), pain syndromes (think Lyme), liver dysfunction, autoimmunity.
  • Overlapping autoimmunity: HLA DR 2 and 4, vitamin D deficiency, microbiome imbalance, leaky gut, hormonal, infections, toxins.
  • 7 point action plan: symptoms drive diagnosis and treatment, lower inflammation, detoxify, repair damage, provide internal balance with cytokines/hormones/microbiome, master sleep/food/exercise, heal emotional wounds.
  • 1/3 of patients have PTSD from some sort of abuse; immune system has been told they don't deserve to get better. DNRS, EFT are helpful tools.
  • May have Lyme if you have more than one symptom; fatigue, pain, insomnia, cognitive problems, depression. Symptoms come and go. Pain migrates around the body. Symptoms worsen around cycle. Symptoms worsen or improve with antibiotics.
  • Positive tests for Lyme and coinfections.
  • Tests are not reliable; need to do a panel approach.
  • Horowitz MSIDS Questionnaire has been validated.
  • Migratory pain differentials: rheumatic fever, Crohn's/IBD, Gonococcal Arthritis, Hepatitis, Reactive Arthritis, Lupus, and Lyme disease (only one with migratory nerve pain)
  • Antibodies may not be found as they are bound up in immune complexes. Borrelia can subvert a B cell response. Borrelia evades the immune system
  • EM rash occurs in 20% of chronic Lyme patients; some figures go as low a 7%. 75% of the rashes do not look like EM rashes even when there is a rash.
  • IGeneX ImmunoBlot has 7 strains where prior Western Blot used only 2, and most labs use only 1.
  • FISH more useful for Bartonella and Babesia than for Borrelia.
  • If it looks like Lyme but is negative, look for relapsing fever (TBRF).
  • Bartonella FISH testing has been helpful from IGeneX.
  • 10-16% of people in Lyme endemic areas test positive for Powassan virus.
  • Prioritize abnormalities on MSIDS map based on history/physical, create differential diagnosis for every symptom, address inflammation.
  • A low histamine diet is often important.
  • Address inflammation: block NFKb and activate Nrf2, block activation of glial cells, anti-inflammatory diet, replace minerals, get proper rest/exercise, treat infections, detox, balance hormones/cytokines/microbiome, heal damage, heal the mind and emotions.
  • Annie Hopper's DNRS very helpful.
  • Bartonella is the most resistant intracellular infection.
  • Persistence after treatment was common.
  • Borrelia lives in biofilm microcolonies; must open biofilms and address persisters.
  • Have to consider: Actively dividing forms, round body/cyst forms, intracellular forms, and stationary/persister/biofilm forms.
  • Majority of the relevant microbes are intracellular.
  • Doxy/Rifampin/Dapsone + detoxification often leads patients to higher ground.
  • Oregano EO, cinnamon EO, clove EO, stevia, Biocidin, oregano oil all shown to help biofims.
  • 150 people in Disulfiram; start SLOW! Herxes are enormous.
  • Have seen Babesia and Bartonella persistence on FISH after Disulfiram.
  • Not yet finding tools to clear Bartonella; even though people feel better with treatment. Same with Babesia.
  • Herbs do work but do not clear the organisms from the body.
  • Obstacles to Healing: MCAS, GI issues/SIBO, MCS and detox problems, multiple infections, immune deficiency, immune overactivation, sleep, emotional trauma, POTS/dysautonomia, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell danger response, underlying medical problems.
  • High dose glutathione 2000 mg liposomal 2-3 times per day, NAC 600mg BID, and ALA 600mg BID (just like used for a Herx in Lyme) may be supportive tools in COVID-19.

Rolf Halden, PhD spoke on "Hiding in Plain Sight: Triclosan and Triclocarban as Immunotoxicants" and shared:

  • Looking in wastewater treatment plant can provide lots of health insights.
  • WWTPs are an underutilized "Information Super Highway"
  • Tricolcarban and Tricolosan are antimicrobial compounds.
  • Traces of toxic dioxin (TCDD) are presented in tricolsan.
  • Triclosan and triclocarban have numerous health-negating properties.
  • Triclosan products used for 5-10 seconds on the hands is ineffective but are toxic to aquatic organisms.
  • Soap is used and ends up in sewage and then an agriculture.
  • In 1994, only 50 products contained these substance. Went up to 700 by 2001 and ultimately to over 2000.
  • Chemicals on hands -> wastewater -> fertilizer -> food.
  • These two compounds were the most abundant; removing these two reduced toxicants in sludge by over 60%.
  • Human Health Observatory at ASU is the largest archive in the world.
  • 300 WWTPs globally; 200 in the US.
  • If a chemical accumulates in sewage sludge, it probably accumulates in people too.
  • Halogenated chemicals are less likely to be broken down and may lead to more toxicity.

Nigel Plummer, PhD spoke on "Toxicants and the Microbiome" and shared:

  • Looking at the impact of xenobiotics on our microbiome and how the microbiome impacts the biotransformation of xenobiotics
  • The human microbiota is comprised of 100 trillion microbes colonizing the mucosal surfaces of the body; mainly bacteria but also fungi, archaea, protozoa, and viruses.
  • Acquired at birth and have for life; considered almost another organ; weight similar to the liver.
  • If we lose tolerance to our microbiota, irritable bowel disease develops.
  • 3 times more bacteria than our own cells; 1000 species
  • 3 million genes in the body; only 23,000 are ours. The rest are our bugs.
  • 50% of the fecal mass is bacterial biomass; microbiota produce 2-4 liters of gas per day.
  • Resides in the oral cavity, respiratory tract, GI, genito-urinary tract, and skin.
  • Consists of Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria.
  • First microbiota develops during birthing; vaginal birth leads to a different microbiota than a C-section. C-section does not access vaginal microbiome and has a different skin microbiome. C-section has higher risk of GI issues, allergy, obesity.
  • The intestinal microbiota is fully formed by 2-3 years; driven by epigenetics and food intake. Remains similar between age 2-50.
  • 80% of immune system is in the gut; mostly in the small intestine.
  • Small intestine has low number of organisms; large intestine much larger. Flow rate of small intestine is very fast; large intestine slow.
  • Probiotics are proxies for our microbiota.
  • Microbiota helps digestion and absorption but also play key roles in our immune system.
  • Dietary compounds, environmental toxicants, RX, and GMOs enter and lead to disease associated metabolites, efficacy, toxicity (microbiota involved in breaking down Acetaminophen for example), drug activation (drugs activated by the microbiota).
  • Butyrate is the most important SCFA; leads to lower rates of colorectal cancer.
  • Polyphenols are 5-10% absorbed in the small intestine; 90-95% enter the large intestine and the microbioita modify the polyphenols which ultimately leads to health benefits.
  • Chinese have highest number of enzymes; Americans the lowest.
  • Microbiota can impact effectiveness of medications like statins (due to bile metabolism).
  • Germ-free mice have lower ability to excrete mercury; microbota impacts detoxification.
  • Microbiota influences metabolism of xenobiotics; xenobiotics influence the balance of the microbiota.
  • Specific heavy metals increase or decrease different microbes leading to specific health outcomes.
  • Pesticides such as glyphosate decrease beneficial bacteria and increase pathogenic organisms.
  • Artificial sweeteners such as sucralose, aspartame, and saccharin have a similar effect.
  • Modified genes from GMOs may impact us but do not seem to significantly impact our microbiota.
  • Antibiotics have a devastating effect of the small intestine microbiota; minimal effect on large intestine microbiota.
  • Antibiotics decrease microbial diversity, increase inflammation, disrupt immune balance, alter insulin sensitivity, and establish resistant bacteria.
  • Probiotics can mitigate toxicity from heavy metals and improve excretion. Organisms pick up the metals and are taken out through the feces.
  • For ulcerative colitis, VSL #3 shows published evidence.
  • Go with products with published evidence of benefit.
  • ProbioticAdvisor.com was mentioned by another participant as a potentially helpful resource.

Jill Carnahan, MD spoke on "Undiagnosed Viral Infections in Chronic Illness: How to Test and Treat" and shared:

  • Root cause of most illness = toxic load + infectious burden.
  • Viral and fungal infections are opportunistic.
  • Cell danger response coordinates mitochondrial function after injury.
  • The healing cycle is a 3 step sequence to ensure recovery after any injury.
  • Infections can be a trigger for CDR.
  • Infections: Borrelia, Babesia, Ehrlichia, Bartonella, Mycoplasma, Parasites, Mold, Viruses
  • Borrelia: chronic pain, fatigue; treatment: triple intracellular drugs, Disulfiram, biofilm treatment
  • Aluminum is a big issue; often have to ask the labs to test for it. If not on radar, it is a big deal.
  • New study on herbals for Lyme showed Cryptolepis and Japanese Knotweed as top options.
  • Babesia: night sweats, temperature dysregulation, air hunger, anxiety.
  • Bartonella: can be involved in Sarcoid-like conditions, Crohn's, OCD, fear, anxiety, striae.
  • Most difficult clinical cases are resistant Bartonella patients.
  • Disulfiram is good for Lyme, decent for Babesia, not so good for Bartonella.
  • TBRF (relapsing fever): often a cabin setting and ticks come out at night and transmit within 15 seconds; no rash, no known tick bite.
  • Toughest cases lately have been TBRF positive. Much more common than previously considered.
  • Mycoplasma: atypical pneumonias; 90% with Lyme have Mycoplasma. It has systemic impacts; not just respiratory. If titers are 4x normal limit for IgG, considers treatment.
  • Giardia: can cause villous atrophy, big player in leaky gut, instigator of Celiac. Can take 3-7 stool samples to find it.
  • Fungal infections: play a role in autoimmune conditions such as MS; due to weakened immunity, common. Can have auto-brewery syndrome and feel inebriated.
  • Disulfiram can be a problem if high burden of yeast still present; likely a reason for strong Herx reactions with treatment.
  • Urinary organic acids can look for metabolites of various fungi.
  • Treating fungus resolved her Crohn's.
  • Antibiotics may trigger fungi to go from benign for to invasive hyphal form.
  • Treating fungi is 60-90 days or longer.
  • Diet is critical; off sugar, refined carbs. No diet will resolve the problem alone.
  • Coconut oil has antifungal properties.
  • Lyme and coinfections suppress the immune system (as does mold) and lead to reactivation of viruses.
  • Numerous factors weighing down our immune system: parasites, virus, bacteria, toxicants, dental infections, food additives, stress, endotoxins, fungi, mold, and EMFs.
  • Infections can be triggers for autoimmunity including numerous viruses.
  • May see long-term inflammation, fatigue, or autoimmunity after COVID-19.
  • Repressing emotions leads to reactivation of viruses. ACEs play a role; need trauma therapies.
  • EBV is highly correlated with autoimmunity; Lupus and RA have EBV as a key component; MS as well.
  • Tests titers for viruses and then confirms with PCR.
  • EMF exposure activates EBV; there is a connection between EMF exposure and viral activation.
  • Generally does herbals for viral support over RX options.
  • Likes Monolaurin and Olive Leaf for EBV.
  • Corona Virus: surprising that it is not just the elderly that are impacted; high pollution/5G may play a role; probiotics can be very helpful; reducing LPS endotoxemia may reduce duration and severity of illness; spore probiotics likely best for COVID-19; COVID binds to ACE2 receptors which are open when systemic inflammation is unaddressed; LPS can impair ACE2 receptor function; reduce LPS endotoxemia; spore probiotics and bovine immunoglobulins may be helpful; mast cells play a role and MCAS patients may have slightly increased risk; vitamin D may be helpful.
  • Recommendations: Clean air/food/water; high quality air filters; pure water; organic plant-based diet; limit EMF exposure; get outside; breathwork; address mineral deficiency; daily detox rituals (epsom salts, coffee enema, sauna, glutathione); remove root canals/cavitations; heal leaky gut to reduce endotoxemia; treat infections; avoid mold and other toxins; herbal anti-inflammatories/detox support/antioxidants; fresh garllic and sulfur foods.

Stephen Fry, MD spoke on "Difficult to Diagnose Fungi and Mycoplasma: Disorders, Diagnostic Technologies and Pitfalls in Diagnosis and Treatment Options" and shared:

  • Practitioners may not be aggressive enough in the treatment of fungal infections.
  • Even with all the tools available, treating fungi is still difficult.
  • Mycoplasma do not have a cell wall; smallest self-replicating organisms (viruses do not self-replicate); require cholesterol.
  • Respiratory droplets; incubation up to 3 weeks; wide variety of symptoms.
  • Virulent but can also be commensal species in a health person; positive labs do not mean that it is the cause of disease.
  • Mycoplasma implicated in Gulf-War Syndrome.
  • Thomas McPherson Brown felt Mycoplasma was highly involved in RA and autoimmune diseases.
  • Culture, serology, PCR, and sequencing available.
  • PCR and serology can have pitfalls related to cross-reactivity and have false positives; sequencing better.
  • In CFS, they found numerous microbes not found in healthy controls. Did not see Mycoplasma.
  • Inherently resistant to beta-lactams; macrolides are effective; may be susceptible to tetracycline, doxycycline, and fluoroquinolones.
  • 300 clinically relevant fungi; likely 2.2-3.8 million species.
  • Fungi are yeasts, molds, and mushrooms. Cell walls contain chitin, cellulose, or both. Break down dead organic matter and use it as food.
  • Fungal Disorders: Valley Fever, Aspergillosis, Mucormycosis, Candidiasis.
  • Valley Fever: Most in Arizona and California, probably under-recognized. Causes 15-30% of community-acquired pneumonia. Global warming is increasing the locations impacted.
  • Treatment: Fluconazole, Itraconazole, Ampho B; often 3-6 months. No evidence for alternative treatments; vitamin D plays no role (in literature, but he clinically has seen improvement).
  • Aspergillosis: can see fungal balls in some cases; Voriconazole, Liposomal Ampho B, caspofungin, micafungin, posaconazole, itraconazole.
  • Mucormycosis: serious; sinuses/lung after inhaling spores or skin from cut/burn; higher risk in immunosuppressed; treatment is surgical debridement, Ampho B, Posaconazole, Isavuconazole
  • Candidiasis: increasing in recent years; azoles, echinocandins, and Ampho B.
  • Fungi have several mechanisms that increase treatment resistance.
  • Mycotoxins are immunosuppressive; in cases with exposure to mold and mycotoxins, the immune system is suppressed.
  • Dr. Lyn Patrick mentioned historical use of IV Allicin for Valley Fever.
  • Fungal genome is as big as the human genome.
  • Average number of viruses in people in Northern Hemisphere in one study was 10; in the tropics, 20.
  • Alphaviruses are often embedded in tissue and lead to carrying a viral load.
  • Treatment for Mycoplasma is often only a couple of weeks.

Aviad Elgez, ND spoke on "Environmental Medicine in the Treatment of Chronic Lyme Disease" and shared:

  • Connection between infections and toxicity: 1) Immunosuppression, 2) Synergistic effect, and 3) Misdiagnosis
  • Primary symptoms may be from MSIDS and toxins, MSIDS/toxic burden synergy, or one or the other.
  • Toxins are produced by living organisms; toxicants are not produced by living organisms.
  • MSIDS - multiple infections impacting multiple body systems.
  • Symptoms of MSIDS and mold/mycotoxins overlap; nearly identical.
  • Mold is very common, immunotoxic, and neurotoxic; more than 50% of his MSIDS patients had mold as a major contributor to their symptom picture.
  • Any ongoing toxic exposure could explain condition; will hardly ever be one toxin.
  • Multiple exposures and multiple infections lead to illness.
  • In his patients, mold, solvents/VOCs, and formaldehyde are the most common findings in his practice that effect MSIDS.
  • Genetic variations in overall detoxification (GSTT1, GSTM1, GSTP1), mitochondrial oxidative neutralization (SOD2), methylation (MTHFR, SHMT1, MTR, MTRR), estrogen dominance (fast CYP1B1, slow CYP1A2/1A1), and others may play a role.
  • Classic picture of immunotoxicity is reduced Th1 leading to chronic infection and increased Th2 leading to allergy, asthma, MCS, and autoimmunity.
  • Glutathione levels modulate Th1/Th2.
  • Mycophenolic acid can come from food and from the environment; immune suppressant drug used for organ transplant.
  • Finds that treating solvent exposures makes a difference.
  • Has seen infection labs go from positive to negative with a focus on detoxification (likely leading to improved immune response).

Jennifer Nyland, PhD spoke on "Common Exposures: Arsenic, Mercury, and the Immune System" and shared:

  • Arsenic is a poison; was an anti-infective for syphillis, psoriasis, and viral infections.
  • Arsenic was introduced into chicken feed which later leeched into surrounding ground water and made people sick.
  • Mercury is also anti-infective but immunosuppressive. Mercurochrome was used to combat infections; full of mercury.
  • Mercury is released in some places (and historically in the US) to pull out small amounts of gold from the sediments in the environment.
  • Aquatic microorganisms methylate inorganic mercury.
  • The microbiota in us can bind to inorganic mercury, demethylate methylated mercury, and help us remove it from the body.
  • There are also methylating bacteria that come from the environment and may take mercury from dirt on a salad and make it easier to cross into the bloodstream.
  • As we consume larger fish eating smaller fish, this can be a source of concentrated mercury.
  • Dental hygenists are often exposed to mercury.
  • Light switches and bulbs have mercury in them.
  • Once methylated mercury is in the system, it can cross into tissues. Can accumulate in certain tissues.
  • Contaminated drinking water or food can be a source of exposure to arsenic; apple juice.
  • All mercury is toxic; methyl from food/rice, ethyl from vaccines.
  • Mercury activates macrophages and leads to release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (when stimulated with LPS).

Michelle Perro, MD spoke on "Pesticides, Kids, and the Microbiome" and shared:

  • Looked at inflammatory cytokines in autism brains; 2/3 of autism brains showed brain inflammation via perivascular cuffs. T-cells are reacting to a pathogen or abnormally to normal tissue.
  • Sleeping brain is housekeeping via lymphatics; awake brains do not cleanse. ASD children do not sleep.
  • Probiotics and exercise can balance brain plasticity.
  • 54% of American children have a chronic disease.
  • 30% have constipation; 25% have GERD.
  • 70-90% of ASD children have a digestive issue.
  • By 2025, 80% of kids will have a chronic disease.
  • Sick is the new normal.
  • Can affect the microbiome in the first 1000 days.
  • C-section and bottle fed babies have a less health-promoting microbiome.
  • Bifido infantis is often a good choice for babies.
  • There are prebiotics in breast milk to feed the baby's microbiome (HMOs = human milk oligosaccharides). Formula contains 1 prebiotic; breast milk 50-200.
  • Goat or Camel milk formulas are available.
  • Many formulas are full of toxic substances including glyphosate; recommends Baby's Only Organic.
  • Microbes create neurotransmitters, peptides, and inflammatory chemicals that communicate to the brain via the vagus nerve.
  • Pesticide exposure leads to ADHD and memory deficits.
  • Foods with glyphosate have an average of 6 pesticides.
  • GMO cotton is sprayed with pesticides and then made into tampons.
  • Glyphosate: acts as a metal chelator with affinity for manganese and binds zinc (required for smell) and copper, inhibits shikimate pathway in our microbes, inhibits CYP450 detox pathways, induces transgenerational inheritance of disease, used with 96% "inert" surfactants that increase the toxicity.
  • Glyphosate was patented in 2010 as an antibiotic; creates dysbiosis through reduction of health-promoting bacteria and increase of pathogenic bacteria.
  • Kiran Krishnan looked at impact of glyphosate on children's microbiome; significant negative impact with RoundUp. Increase in SCFAs and beneficial bacteria with spores and prebiotics.
  • People with PON1 SNPs have a more difficult time detoxing pesticides.
  • Dietary fiber and probiotics support a healthy microbiota.
  • Lactobacillus fermentum strain ME-3 generates intestinal glutathione.
  • Postbiotics are also important; many probiotics don't survive. She likes to give probiotics after a meal when pH is higher. Wonders why probiotics are not given by suppository.
  • Golf courses use on average 20 different pesticides.

Nafysa Parpia, ND spoke on "Lyme, Mold, Toxicants- Where to Start and How to Finish: Review of Complex Patient Cases" and shared:

  • Most of her patients have been sick for some time; they often presume Lyme disease is their only issue.
  • Killing often backfires; symptoms worsen.
  • The environmental toxic load is more important than the bug.
  • It is about how the body responds to the microbes; immune system dysregulation.
  • Detoxifying first leads to better outcomes with microbial therapies later.
  • Detoxification is mandatory in these patients.
  • People have mold, parasites, viruses, dysbiosis, leaky gut, MCAS, hypercoagulation, head trauma, structural integrity issues including CCI, emotional burden, PTSD, psychological defense strategies, and ACEs.
  • People often respond better to treatment when detox, MCAS, and CCI have been addressed; may need to be treated first.
  • Bob Miller found that those with chronic Lyme disease have more detoxification SNPs than controls. Toxic load can be higher which leads to immune dysregulation.
  • PON1 helps detoxify pesticides; CYP impact phase 1 liver detox and impact drug metabolism, SOD/GST are critical for detox.
  • Even low levels of toxins can be a trigger for the persistence of the cell danger response.
  • ATP goes to surface of the cell and outside the cell to signal danger; a response to cellular insult.
  • Different cells throughout the body can be in different stages of the CDR (CDR1, CDR2, CDR3).
  • Toxins cause the cells to shutdown to protect themselves.
  • Tests: TEC Biosciences (mycotoxins, environmental toxins), Great Plains (mycotoxins, chemicals, glyphosate), Doctor's Data (metals), Functional Genomic Analysis; provokes with IV glutathione before sample collection.
  • Support organs of elimination: gut, liver, kidneys, skin, lymph.
  • Use binders and co-factors for phase 1 and phase 2 liver support.
  • 4R: Remove, Replace, Reinoculate, Repair
  • Favorite supplements for gut; Remove: Black walnut, goldenseal, oregano oil, garlic, olive leaf extract; Replace: enzymes, prebiotics; Reinoculate with spore based probiotics; Repair: glutamine, bone broth, aloe, marshmallow, slippery elm.
  • Favorite binders: citrus pectin, bamboo charcoal, chlorella
  • Uses IV aminos and minerals, PK protocol, glutathione, chelation to bypass the gut.
  • IV detoxification therapies can help people tolerate IV antibiotics.
  • Prefers not to use oral antibiotics due to negative impact to the gut.
  • Likes Aperiomics for broad look at infections.
  • Have seen some people that may have had Lyme but needed no Lyme treatment after detoxification.

David Carpenter, MD spoke on "PCBs: The Toxicant Doctors Don’t Know About" and shared:

  • PCBs are the toxicant that doctor's don't know about.
  • Have not been made since 1976.
  • Everyone has them in our bodies; concentrations are going down, but they are still present in the environment.
  • Manufactured by Monsanto; a thick oil used in capacitors, as solvents, in wall boards, ceiling and floor surfaces.
  • They accumulate in fat and are present in the food chain (that has animal fats); contamination found in rivers; found in fish; in almost all animal fats.
  • Can eat, breathe, or absorb through the skin.
  • Cannot eat a Big Mac or drink a glass of milk without getting PCBs.
  • Penguins and polar bears have very high levels of PCBs.
  • Some PCBs have half-lives of decades or centuries; others weeks or months.
  • Hudson River was contaminated with PCB from GE.
  • PCBs may play a role in hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes.
  • PCBs are immunosuppressive.
  • Hard to avoid exposure to PCBs.
  • Dr. Patrick mentioned Cholestyramine may be helpful for PCBs.

Aristo Vojdani, PhD spoke on "Immunologic Testing in Toxicant Exposure" and shared:

  • Why are ASD, ADD/ADHD, Alzheimer's, Allergies, and Autoimmunity on the rise?
  • Genes are 1/3; environmental factors are 2/3.
  • In Alzheimer's, genes are ~2%; environmental factors are 95%.
  • A simple tea bag contains 20 different toxic chemicals.
  • The food industry makes products with colorings, preservatives, emulsifiers, food glue, gluten, gums, pesticides, aluminum, and other toxic chemicals; these can open the gut barriers; autoimmunogenic additives.
  • The process of a "sick brain" may take 20 years; presents a window of opportunity for intervention.
  • If gut barrier is compromised, toxic chemicals get into the blood and lead to autoimmunity; including neuro-autoimmunity when the blood-brain barrier is broken.
  • 6-"Ome" Concept of Autoimmunity - Genome, Exposome, Foodome, Gut Microbiome, and Immunome lead to the Auto-Immunome
  • pH of soda is 2.2; vinegar is 2.3. When microbiome is exposed to so much acid, what happens to the microbiome?
  • Xenobiotics have immunomodulatory effects; responsible for many immune system disorders; affecting innate and adaptive immunity.
  • Xenobiotics can aggregate IgG; as can exposure to lectins and agglutinins. Then IgM antibodies attack IgG antibodies. Unaddressed, this can lead to Rheumatoid Arthritis.
  • Find the trigger, remove the trigger, and prevent autoimmune diseases in the future.
  • Exposed to 150,000 chemicals; water/air/food.
  • 9 million deaths per year are due to exposure to toxic chemicals.
  • Exposome is the external (stress, lifestyle, pollution, diet/additives, medications, infections) and internal (xenobiotics, gut flora, inflammation, lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress, and protein adducts) environment.
  • His experiences with the exposome: million lab tests from individuals exposed to toxic chemicals from various work environments, pesticides, superfund sites, silicone breast implants, demetam sodium in Shasta, Gulf War Syndrome, 9/11 and Ground Zero, mold/mycotoxins, autism/ADD/ADHD, allergies
  • Common denominators: CFS/Fibromyalgia, Abnormal CD4/CD8 ratio, low NK cell, low or high T/B cell function, high pro-inflammatory cytokines, low anti-inflammatory cytokines, low or high immunoglobulins/C3 and C4 complement, tissue antibodies, positive ANA/DNA/RF, hormone and chemical antibodies
  • Differentiation of T cells is impacted by exposure to toxic chemicals.
  • CD4 (helper) / CD8 (suppressor) should be around 2; discussed a patient with 8.6 ratio which shows immune activation. Like a car with an accelerator and no break; leads to future autoimmunity. Another patient had a ratio of 0.3; chemical AIDS; immune deficiency.
  • Keep NK cells as active as possibly using 500-1000mg vitamin C orally.
  • 6 Roads to Autoimmunity:
    • Chemicals bind to tissue proteins and form neo-antigens or protein adducts (RF, HA1c)
    • Chemicals directly damage the tissue such as thyroid, epithelial cells, DNA and release their contents
    • Chemicals bind to foods and prevent digestion
    • Chemicals change our microbiome and release LPS
    • Chemicals activate autoreactive T-cells
    • Chemicals act like adjuvants and lead to auto-antibody production (silicone breast implants, botox)
  • Toxins can bind to our own tissue creating adducts and lead to auto-antibody production.
  • Protein adduct formation when BBQing food; charcoal binds to the proteins in the food forming new antigens.
  • When exposed to toxic chemicals, we cannot measure them in the urine alone; best to measure in tissue.
  • Mercury can trigger autoimmunity; can bind to human tissue.
  • Healthy people make antibodies against many chemicals.
  • Common xenobiotics include aflatoxins, formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, benzene, BPA, parabens, mercury, metals.
  • There is no safe alternative to plastic; plastic is plastic.
  • If antibodies to toxins cross the blood brain barrier, it can trigger the production of amyloid.
  • Body burden of chemicals is the most important part.
  • Look for body burden; not chemicals coming out in the urine.
  • Exposome is becoming the most important factor; food additive, preservatives, toxic chemicals, pollutants, bacteria, and fungi can disturb the gut; leading to low grade inflammation and release of LPS and other compounds creating leaky gut; leads to breakdown of blood-brain barrier and brain inflammation. 

Disclaimer: While I attempted to accurately represent the statements of the various speakers, it is possible that the above contains errors or inaccuracies. If you have any corrections to the content listed above, please Contact Me.  


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  BetterHealthGuy.com is intended to share my personal experience in recovering from my own chronic illness.  Information presented is based on my journey working with my doctors and other practitioners as well as things I have learned from conferences and other helpful resources.  As always, any medical decisions should be made only with the guidance of your own personal medical authority.  Everyone is unique and what may be right for me may not be right for others.   

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